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Tuesday 07th April 2015 from 14:00 (Europe/Zurich)

DRAFT agenda: ATLAS Weekly

by Charlton Dave

 

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DRAFT agenda: ATLAS Weekly
 
Upcoming Events

AMS DAYS AT CERN - The Future of Cosmic Ray Physics and Latest Results

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Experiment on the International Space Station has to date recorded over 60 billion cosmic ray events (e-, e+, p, antiproton, He, Li, B/C ...) up to TeV energies. AMS is a precision particle physics detector built with multiple redundancies and adapted to withstand the hostile environment of space over its long duration mission. The AMS Detector was assembled at CERN and extensively calibrated at the CERN accelerator before launch from the Kennedy Space Center to the ISS in May 2011. During the first four years of AMS on the ISS, the AMS Collaboration has been engaged in an intensive effort to analyze the increasing volume of charged cosmic rays collected with an accuracy of ~1%. First AMS results on electrons and positrons have been published in Physical Review Letters and further precise results will soon be presented on anti-proton to proton ratio; proton, helium, and other nuclei fluxes; electron, positron, electron and positron and positron fraction at higher energies. The objective of the three-day “AMS Days at CERN” is to exchange ideas and experiences with the world’s leading theoretical and experimental physicists.  This exchange will lead to a better understanding of the implications of AMS results (published and to be published) and their relevance to some of the key experiments as well as the future course of cosmic ray physics.

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AMS DAYS AT CERN - The Future of Cosmic Ray Physics and Latest Results
The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Experiment on the International Space Station has to date recorded over 60 billion cosmic ray events (e-, e+, p, antiproton, He, Li, B/C ...) up to TeV energies. AMS is a precision particle physics detector built with multiple redundancies and adapted to withstand the hostile environment of space over its long duration mission. The AMS Detector was assembled at CERN and extensively calibrated at the CERN accelerator before launch from the Kennedy Space Center to the ISS in May 2011. During the first four years of AMS on the ISS, the AMS Collaboration has been engaged in an intensive effort to analyze the increasing volume of charged cosmic rays collected with an accuracy of ~1%. First AMS results on electrons and positrons have been published in Physical Review Letters and further precise results will soon be presented on anti-proton to proton ratio; proton, helium, and other nuclei fluxes; electron, positron, electron and positron and positron fraction at higher energies. The objective of the three-day “AMS Days at CERN” is to exchange ideas and experiences with the world’s leading theoretical and experimental physicists.  This exchange will lead to a better understanding of the implications of AMS results (published and to be published) and their relevance to some of the key experiments as well as the future course of cosmic ray physics.
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IT Lightning Talks: session #5

by Dr. Di Meglio Alberto, Lopienski Sebastian

IT Lightning Talks (ITLT) are short presentations on any topic related to computing technology or to the IT department. See more here: https://twiki.cern.ch/IT/LightningTalks/

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IT Lightning Talks: session #5
IT Lightning Talks (ITLT) are short presentations on any topic related to computing technology or to the IT department. See more here: https://twiki.cern.ch/IT/LightningTalks/
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Higgs Machine Learning Challenge visits CERN

The Higgs Machine Learning challenge (HiggsML https://higgsml.lal.in2p3.fr) ran on the Kaggle platform in summer 2014. Official simulated ATLAS events were publicly released, and participants competed to invent the most powerful algorithms to improve the statistical significance of the Higgs to tau+tau- signal. The participation was overwhelming with more than 1700 teams, Machine learning specialists, physicists, students, submitted more than 30.000 solutions, making it the most popular Kaggle challenge to date. During these few months, a typical HEP problem has been tackled with the most advanced machine learning techniques. This mini workshop is a step towards importing the lessons of the challenge back into High Energy Physics.

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Higgs Machine Learning Challenge visits CERN
The Higgs Machine Learning challenge (HiggsML https://higgsml.lal.in2p3.fr) ran on the Kaggle platform in summer 2014. Official simulated ATLAS events were publicly released, and participants competed to invent the most powerful algorithms to improve the statistical significance of the Higgs to tau+tau- signal. The participation was overwhelming with more than 1700 teams, Machine learning specialists, physicists, students, submitted more than 30.000 solutions, making it the most popular Kaggle challenge to date. During these few months, a typical HEP problem has been tackled with the most advanced machine learning techniques. This mini workshop is a step towards importing the lessons of the challenge back into High Energy Physics.
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